Pregnant refugees from Nauru protesting on bus near Darwin detention centre, group says

Two pregnant women brought from Nauru to Darwin to give birth are refusing to get off a bus with their families near the Wickham Point Detention Centre, asylum seeker advocates say.

Refugee Action Coalition spokesman Ian Rintoul said the families were from Iran and had spent 15 months in detention on Nauru.

They were among a group found to be refugees and resettled within Nauruan communities earlier this year, he said.

He said the women had been brought to Australia yesterday to give birth.

They had been assured they would not be placed in detention while in Darwin, he said.

“When they arrived in Australia, they were told they would be taken to the detention centre and put on a bus to take them to Wickham Point,” he said.

They arrived at the centre and began their protest before midnight last night, he said.

“The women are both around eight months pregnant,” he said.

The 10-year-old son of one of the women and both women’s husbands were on the bus, he said.

Mr Rintoul said he had spoken with a brother in law of one of the women, who was in Australia, as well as friends of the families on Nauru.

He said pregnant asylum seekers were often transferred from Nauru to Wickham Point to give birth, but this was the first time the policy had been applied to refugees living outside of detention.

The ABC has contacted the Department of Immigration and Border Protection for comment.

Source: ABC news.

Related: Manifesto for a pogrom: hostility to resettled refugees grows on Nauru

ANARCHIST AFFLICTION

ferguson

Now the G20 is over and the fever has passed we’ve got other afflictions to contend with .. such as

INSURRECTO-RIOTOSIS .

This is the name of the latest show from The Stimulator we play the first half straight up on the show.

We talk a little about the G20. We want to focus on the future now and how we can build a strong anarchist resistance in Brisbane.

One thing that is sure not to cure any anarchist related affliction you have is how you choose to spend your money.

To look into this further we play a short video by Savage Revival called Individualism vs Resistance.

This show aired just before the Furguson verdict was announced and Anna shares some of the background to the story.

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[audio http://www.radio4all.net/responder.php/download/78162/86344/98542/?url=http://www.radio4all.net/files/punkassneenja@riseup.net/1972-1-25112014_4ZZZ_AARADIO_web.mp3]

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Indigenous Australia knows the cynicism exposed by Michael Brown’s killing in Ferguson

By Larissa Behrendt an academic, writer, film maker and Indigenous advocate

After a Missouri grand jury declined to indict police officer Darren Wilson for the killing of Michael Brown, prosecuting attorney Bob McCulloch said that the decision was based upon physical and scientific evidence, not “public outcry or political expediency”.

This call for objectivity does little in a situation where autopsies show Wilson had shot Brown at least six times, twice in the head. McCulloch seemed to compromise his own objectivity by blaming social and news media for beating up a story, rather than acknowledging that when a young person is shot by law enforcement, people expect a level of accountability.

Watching the events in Ferguson unfold raises similar questions about Australia’s own legal system. The parallel is immediately drawn with the failure to secure a conviction in the case of 36-year-old Cameron Mulrunji Doomadgee, who died in a Palm Island lockup over 10 years ago.

Mulrunji was picked up for singing “Who let the dogs out” at a police officer, Chris Hurley, who drove past him in the street. He was charged with public nuisance. He had been in police custody for only an hour when he died. An autopsy revealed four broken ribs, which had ruptured his liver and spleen.

Hurley was indicted for assault and manslaughter but acquitted in 2007. He is the only person ever charged over a death in custody of an Aboriginal person in Australia.

Emotions overflowed after Doomadgee’s death in custody. A riot broke out on Palm Island. It was, like in Ferguson, as much a protest against a single act of injustice as against a system that seemed riddled with it. No police officer was ever successfully prosecuted for Doomadgee’s death, but several Aboriginal men, including Palm Island spokesperson Lex Wotton, were successfully prosecuted for the ensuing riots and received a seven year prison sentence.

Would it have been realistic to expect this outcome on Palm Island? The Ferguson grand jury’s decision certainly seems to have been anticipated on social media, reflecting the persistence of deep cynicism about the criminal justice system.

Anyone who has lived in the US – or even visited – will notice that poverty is racialised. 15.1% of Americans live in poverty; of that 28.4% were black and 26.6% were Hispanic. The events in Ferguson are perhaps a way of highlighting that the election of Barack Obama has done little or nothing to change the US’s deeply ingrained cultures of exclusion, marginalisation and stereotyping.

Obama’s response to the eruption of a new wave of violence, and the broader disappointment and anger about the grand jury decision, showed his own understanding of the perceptions of bias in the legal system. His call to respect the rule of law was accompanied by pleas for calm and constructive protest; then-Queensland premier Peter Beattie struck a similar tone after Hurley was acquitted, urging Queenslanders “to accept the decision of the court without question.”

 A rally in Brisbane following the police murder of Mulrinji Doomadgee 2004

Obama also admitted that there were legitimate grounds for mistrust of the police, including that white police officers are seen to get away with killing young black men, while young black men seem to have no problem getting locked up. According to US Department of Justice figures from 2009, African Americans make up 40% of the US male prison population.

These patterns are replicated in Australia. Between 2000 and 2013, the adult Indigenous imprisonment rate increased by 57%, while the non-Indigenous rate did not show significant change. The rate of juvenile detention sits at about 24 times that of non-Indigenous youth. Indigenous people make up just 3% of the Australian population.

There are dozens of instances where Aboriginal people are killed in custody. The 1987 Royal Commission into Aboriginal deaths in custody investigated 99 of them. Since then, 340 Indigenous people have died in custody.

Some of these have been high profile. In 2008, respected Elder Mr Ward died in the back of a paddy wagon, after being driven 400km across the WA desert. He had been arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol.

More recently, 22-year-old woman Ms Dhu died in police custody in the South Hedland police station while she was being held in police custody to “pay down” around $1,000 in unpaid fines.

These deaths accumulate to cause a similar level of distrust with a legal system, particularly in the way it administers justice. Other than the unsuccessful prosecution of Chris Hurley, not a single charge has been laid, not a single person held to account. To return to McCulloch, is the long-term failure of African Americans and Indigenous Australians by their legal systems not also an “objective” reality?

While there is much talk about why violence occurs in this context, it also raises the more profound and long-reaching question: what will we do to fix a system where cynicism is rife and racial bias seems to abound? How do we change a conversation when there is suspicion that the system is stacked against the marginalised, and the powerful are defensive about being critiqued.

If there is a shining answer to this problem, it’s the Aboriginal community of Redfern. Riots erupted there in 2004 when TJ Hickey, a 17-year old Aboriginal man, was killed. After police chased him in their car while he was riding his bike, he was impaled on a fence. Hickey’s death sparked an emotional response from a community that had long been targeted by the police. Violence broke out and was eventually beaten back by police with fire hoses; law enforcement were castigated by the Sydney Morning Herald for their poor preparation.

Perhaps nothing was unusual about the situation in Redfern. What was unusual was the longer-term response. Police command changed and the new officer in charge, Commander Luke Freudenstein, built a relationship with the local community. A range of programs to build self-esteem in young people, particularly young men, were a success. As a result of this grassroots effort, the community transformed and far fewer young Indigenous men were arbitrarily picked up by the police, to end up in the lockup.

The lesson isn’t that good can come from civil unrest, so much as that change really is possible, if we address the issues that lead to outbursts of emotion and violence.

As the events in Ferguson unfold, it’s clear that their community is a microcosm of the deep-seated issues in the US. Ferguson is perhaps also a sign of what happens anywhere that key institutions, like the criminal justice system, are unreflective about their own entrenched biases – biases that colour outcomes when justice is what we need most.

Originally posted at Guardian Australia.

Seminole Tribe Fights Florida Power Company to Save Panther

Warrior Publications

Panther florida 1Indian Country Today, Nov 6, 2014

First it was oil companies eyeing fracking potential in the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge, and now it’s the Florida Power & Light Co. (FPL), which is pondering a new power plant in prime habitat for the endangered animal.

The power company owns a total of 7,801 acres, according to The Palm Beach Post.  The Seminole tribe is in court fighting the FPL’s attempts to build a plant on this land, which is just north of the tribe’s Big Cypress Reservation. The tribe sued the FPL and Hendry County in 2011, after 3,109 acres were rezoned to allow the plant, which would be powered by natural gas, the newspaper said. The matter has been in contention ever since, part of a malpractice lawsuit against one of the state’s largest law firms related to the deal, The Palm Beach Post reported.

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G20 (black) BLOC PARTY AND BULLSHIT

G20 (black) BLOC PARTY AND BULLSHIT

Well Brisbane ‘Australia’s new world city’ hosted the G20….. the media hyped it up for months all the world’s anarchists were coming to Brisbane to smash shit up and kill your grandmother.

What ended up happening was that it was really fucking hot, Tony Abbott made a fool of us once again and there was a street parade involving .001% of Brisbane’s population.

The police are hailing their operation a huge success……. the media claiming all the police stopped any violence or property destruction from happening. To be honest it’s a bit sickening.

Will anything change? Would more direct action have changed anything?

There are the things we must think critically about, future shows will discuss this more.

The cult of non violence is something that is well and truly dominant in Brisbane’s ‘left’ movement. To think critically about this we play an interview with Peter Gelderloos author of How Nonviolence Protects the State and The Failure of Nonviolence.

Also I wrote some satire about the BLACK BLOC PARTY that could have been.

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Exclusive: ARIA Nominees Links to Mistreatment of Asylum Seekers Revealed

This is great investigating… The full article has been removed but for more about this visit https://manusleaks.wordpress.com/

Manusleaks

Sheppard’s song Geronimo features in the current Subway ad

Brisbane pop band Sheppard have had a stellar year. In the space of 12 months the eponymously named group – centred around siblings George, Amy and Emma Sheppard – have hit the top of the Australian charts; achieved international success; appeared on the Ellen De Generes show; toured Europe; and scored a lucrative advertising deal with Subway. Their spectacular rise has culminated in the band scoring nominations in 7 categories at the upcoming ARIA awards, including Song of the Year for their hit single Geronimo, and Album of the Year for their debut 11 track release Bombs Away.

Their rise has all been made possible by the financial backing of their parents, Greg and Linda Sheppard, who reputedly invested their life savings in their children’s musical careers. The Sheppard’s are a close-knit family, and despite their ever-increasing fame the band members continue…

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EXCLUSIVE G20 BLACK BLOC PARTY SETS BNE ON FIRE

EXCLUSIVE G20 BLACK BLOC PARTY SETS BNE ON FIRE

The event we had all spent years waiting for was finally on. The #G20 security ring of steel had been erected.

South Brisbane was in serious LOCK DOWN… the media said the barricades were intimidating, South Bank a fortress.

All year the media talked about a black bloc party in Brisbane so Megsie Lemon Grass and I went in search of it and to check the security arrangements.

Things started off well.... this dumpster looked like it was ready for the black bloc party...Things started off well…. this dumpster looked like it was ready for the black bloc party…

BLACKBLOCTOOLSYep we could have some fun with all this rumble…

We walked down towards the Convention Centre and found this sticker which seemed to be advertising the (black) bloc party.OMGG20WTFAfter this we saw 100s of the one time… the thin blue line looked rather plump as I asked them if they knew about the (black) bloc party but they just wanted to go and sit in the shade.

POLICE IN THE SHADE

Still that many police are a sure sign that a (black) bloc party is going to happen.

FALL DOWNMegsie tried to climb the barricades but fell down…

THROUGH THE BARRICADEI got to the other side but it was really boring… The ring of steal was no match for Megsie though as she kicked down a barricade to let me through

TIP OVER BARRICADE

KICK SIGNThis sign could be kicked over as part of the (black) bloc party… but there’s no one around to see it fall so does it really fall at all?

POSE WITH SECURITYThese drivers/security asked us to let them know if we found the party…

BEERBEERBEERThese would certainly start the party…

MOVEBINAll the police we asked about the (black) bloc party thought it sounded fun and wanted to come along…. it would be til they turned up so I tipped over this dumpster to make our own barricade..

PUNCH SECURITYThis security guard was not in the mood for a party so Megsie dealt with him true ninja style…..

LOOSE PROJECTILEAll the police I ask about the (black) bloc party think it sounds good luckily Megsie found a loose projectile to throw at them when they came to ruin our fun.

1511190_10152851116069596_91834903137370908_nSomeone’s planned ahead … this will be great for powering the sound system…

G20 police policing‘We’re looking for the G20 (black) bloc party, do you know about it? ‘ ‘Huh… no… black bloc… party .. no… er… der…. geetwenny … why don’t we have Segways?’

Abomination Maybe Lowkey is coming to the party…

movesignWho left this here? We heard Obama was coming so we blocked the street with it…

binbombBetter get this shield ready for the party…

molotovFinally we found someone else preparing for the (black) bloc party… Megsie gets ready to make (molotov) cocktails…

DSC_0135Quiet before the storm…

DSC_0023Fight for your right to party…. I mean party for your right to fight…

JLL 021The po po are wearing fluros to get in the party mood….

colours of genecideWe displayed the true colors of Brisbane

march 187This happy party goer missed the memo about prohibited items but somehow managed to avoid detection…

Kicking off

We gave an anarchist a cigarette and a Molotov cocktail and really got the party started

Burn baby burnWe warned the police to be careful where they parked their cars in this heat

Police car ruined

Tony angryTony is pretty angry about the mess we made and randomly mentioned something about the budget and $7 co payments

angela merkel partyAngela Merkel thanked us for rioting because it made her feel right at home…

putin offerPutin offered to arm us… can someone explain what these are? And if we need them?

Dragunov SVD, BM-27 Uragan, VPK-3927 Volk, S-400 missile system, A-100 AWACS, 6B43 Body Armor, MP-443 Grach, KSVK, ABCE, V0dKa 100P, OSV-96, VIT-B12, RPK-74, VLaD2000, GM-94

OBAMA SADAnd Obama was just really sad about how much C02 we would have released into the atmosphere because it’s going to put a huge dint in his target to reduce greenhouse emissions.

OBAMA GREEN HORNETWe reminded him about his zero emissions fighter jet and he calmed down realising how much it was going to help save the planet…

You may not hear about this on the news but it really happened. Brisbane isn’t that boring after all…

Operation Lizard Jam by Monster Zoku Onsomb! on Mixcloud

This is another thing that rocked Brisvegas this #G20 weekend…