Australia and its Colonial Operations

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by Behrouz Boochani

Yesterday evening an Iranian man wanted to kill himself by cutting his neck. I posted some words about his action but people did not pay serious attention to him. I reported what was happening to him to media and other organisations.

This man claims that an Australian officer beat him and punched him. He wrote a complaint to the PNG police. He was very angry because after a few days he was still not able to access police and put his complaint to them. Yesterday, the officer who punched him was about to leave Manus and his complaint had not been given to the PNG police as he had asked.

This system and these companies, Broadspectrum and Wilson Security do not allow people access to the PNG police, they do not pass on our complaints either. Any staff member who commits a crime is assisted by these organisations and, I believe, the Australian government to leave Manus without going to court.

Remember the officers who raped a local Manusian woman. They were flown out of Manus and were never questioned or charged, or taken to the PNG court. Remember those staff members who helped Joshua to kill Reza Baratti? They were also flown off Manus and never returned to face court.

I, myself, had a suspicious accident when a basketball board fell on my head. I wrote several requests asking to access the PNG police so they could investigate. Again they did not pass on my request or allow me access to the PNG police.

I want to say that all of these happenings are because of colonial thinkings. Australia is exercising colonial power in and against PNG. We can see this too in Australia’s reaction after the PNG Supreme court hearing.

Australia does not want to accept the Supreme court order. Only in a colonial system can you commit a crime and not go to court.

Australia continues its colonial system against Aboriginal people in Australia and now also in PNG.

I believe that yesterday was a very important day because we understood clearly how the Australian government is ruling its prisons in Manus and Nauru under a colonial system.

 

West Papua Honai Embassy Vigil – Melbourne

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West papuan and non-Papuan activists and supporters for a Free West Papua in Melbourne prepare to set up a vigil overnight across the Indonesian Consulate.

As part of the global flag raising day, it is tragic to hear about the arrests of hundreds of Papuan Student of Alliance (AMP) in Jogjakarta and shootings in Yapen that left four people died.

Spokesperson at the West Papua Honai Embassy – Melbourne, Ronny Kareni, condemned the inhumane treatment of Papuans who peacefully celebrate this historic day.

“We are saddened by the lost of our Papuan activists by Indonesian security forces crackdown on peaceful activists and condemned the barbaric act from the state,” said Mr Kareni. ”It clearly shows Indonesia has no place in West Papua.”

The sad news has strengthened the conviction of the supporters at the West Papua Honai Embassy  to continue their vigil overnight. Izzy Brown, who helped in organising the event today said “We stand in solidarity with West Papuans who were arrested today Jogjakarta and West Papua.”

The supporters at the Honai Embassy call out for Melbournians to come and join them in solidarity at the camp in support for the ongoing cry and hopes of the indigenous people of West Papua.

Meg. a Jaadwa woman and member of Warriors of the Aboriginal Resistance, said that she came in solidarity with our West Papuan brothers and sisters in their shared struggles.

“We condemn the Australian government’s involvement in training and funding Indonesian paramilitary forces that protect the interests of Australian and multinational mining corporations,” Meg said. She drew parallels between the forced closures of Aboriginal homeland communities and re-iterated that as indigenous people they are united.

The people also raised a traditional West Papuan Honai flag to symbolise indigenous peoples’ struggles as they are displaced from their homelands, their culture, language and freedom. The flag was raised in solidarity with activists across West Papua repressed by Indonesian forces when they attempted to raise the flag this morning.

Since the Morning Star flag was first raised 54 years ago, the Melanesian peoples of West Papua have continued to suffer under Indonesian occupation. An estimated 500,000 have gone people missing or been murdered since the Indonesian invasion in 1963.

The Australian government is complicit in this slow genocide through its military and diplomatic support of the Indonesian government. Multinational mining corporations wreak environmental devastation for huge profit while local people are displaced from their homelands.

West Papuans and their supporters from all over the world call on their governments to support West Papua’s claim of their homeland and freedom for their people.

via Izzy Brown

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onepeople

ANARCHY IN ROJAVA

ANARCHY IN ROJAVA
A ‪#‎women‬ ‪#‎Kurdish‬ fighter from the ‪#‎YPJ‬ in ‪#‎Kobanê‬.
A ‪#‎women‬ ‪#‎Kurdish‬ fighter from the ‪#‎YPJ‬ in ‪#‎Kobanê‬.

After revisiting the Anarchist Alphabet for a look at G is for Gentrification the show goes into an interview with Nicky Danesh from the Middle Eastern Anarchist Network.

Nicky speaks about what is happening in Northern Syria in a region called Rojava.

Here’s what David Greaber had to say after visiting the region

Well, if anyone had any doubt in their minds about whether this was really a revolution, or just some kind of window-dressing, I’d say the visit put that permanently to rest. There are still people talking like that: This is just a PKK (The Kurdistan Workers’ Party) front, they’re really a Stalinist authoritarian organization that’s just pretending to have adopted radical democracy. No. They’re totally for real. This is a genuine revolution.

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MUSIC

INSURGE – POLITICAL PRISONERS

Also features this Kurdish song – EM BERNADIN VE DILANE

The documentary I mention I watched.

FUCK THE POLICE

FUCK THE POLICE

bullattackcop

This episode is called fuck the police because… well fuck them and the system they support and help perpetuate.

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Franklin Lopéz joins us to talk about his new DVD project subMedia A Decade of Subversion.

He also gives us his thoughts on the killing of police by community members.

And fondly recalls his trip to Australia which included taking part in the 40th Anniversary Celebrations at the Aboriginal Tent Embassy in Canberra.

The fit with the season as we do every year we play A Junkie’s Christmas by William S Burroughs.

The music for this sedition was requested by Franklin.  Also check out this video of a kangaroo knocking out a drone.

fuckchristmas

MUSIC

Intro – Resident Anti-hero

Backing music- Monkey Marc

Outro – Insurge Political Prisoners

FLYING GREEK ANARCHISTS

FLYING GREEK ANARCHISTS

FTP

I could just about call every show we do FUCK THE POLICE and this one is no exception… but it goes without saying these days right? and the flying Greek Anarchists is a truly inspiration story.

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The show kicks off with April 29 1992 … a song about the riots in the aftermath of the acquittal of 4 people officers for the (video taped) beating of Rodney King.

There are riots all over America at the moment as communities rise up and express their discontent at yet more cases of police brutality (and fatalities) in which the officers involved are not held responsible for their conduct.

This song I think is the song for these times… especially the chorus ‘It’s about coming up and staying on top …. And screaming 187 on a motherfuckin’ cop’

Not that I would suggest violence…. just self defense.

The reason why the flying anarchists were hurling molotov cocktails (and a fridge!) was the hunger strike of Niko Romanos and the anniversary of the police murder of Alexandros Grigoropoulos in December 2008 .

In Greece they say ‘remember, remember the sixth of December’

Romanos was the best friend of Alexandros Grigoropoulos and Alexis died in his arms, this event radicalised Romanos.

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He is serving time in prison for a bank robbery which targeted one of the banks that was never brought to account for its part in Greek’s economic woes.

“What is the robbing of a bank compared to the founding of a bank?” (Bertolt Brecht)

His hunger strike ended last week when the Greek government gave in to his demand for access to education.

Below is an excerpt from a text written by Romanos about hunger strikes.

A hunger strike is the ultimate means of struggle of a revolutionary individual. Historically it has been used by a wide political spectrum of fighters held hostage for their subversive action, mainly against democratic regimes.

From the dead hunger strikers of the r.o. Red Army Faction (RAF) and the deaths of the fighters of the IRA and ETA, up to the successful hunger strikes of anarchist comrades such as Christophoros Marinos and Kostas Kalaremas, the members of Revolutionary Struggle and the CCF. Points in common can be minimal to non-existent, but there is a decision which remains the same, “I am fighting to the end.”

This decision has been capable of creating specific blackmail against the State. Blackmail which, as paradoxical as it might sound, has gained important power of negotiation because of the dead hunger strikers.

And right at the end of the show we interview Steve Towson about his new song Christmas Island . Which is a fundraiser for the Asylum Seeker Resource Center.

MUSIC

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RIGHT TO REBEL

FIGHT BACK

Here’s a mix I put together for Outlawzzz Radio which airs 10-12 midnight also on 4ZZZ Brisbane.

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Marcel CartierRight to Rebel

 

TEST THEIR LOGIC – P.O.V

Mic RighteousDon’t it Make you wonder (freedom for Palestine)

JARED PAUL – SIX IS NINE

WESTBRED DIAMONDSTILL A NIGGA

Dr Dre – FUCK YOU

ΕΞΤΑΣΗ ΤΕΑΜ – ΑΝΤΑΡΣΙΑ  (Examination Team – Mutiny)

εΜεS ~ The Government is Corrupt

Agripnos feat. Kiknio Asma, PWe are Strangers Everywhere

DDM – Total Destruction of Capitalism

CHUMBAWAMBATHE GOOD SHIP LIFESTYLE

Immortal_Technique_Vernon_ReidW.A.R

ENLIGHTENED FOOLIN THE BEGINNING

Dr Dre – Murder Ink

 

Scott Morrison may gloat but asylum seekers’ boats haven’t really stopped

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The Guardian

Two facts emerge as the UNHCR meets in Geneva to look at protection for refugees at sea: more people than ever are fleeing their country by boat, and deterrence doesn’t stop them…

For all the slogans and military operations, over 54,000 people have boarded boats across the Indian Ocean this year, with around 20,000 in just the two months of October and November. As much as Scott Morrison may gloat, the boats haven’t really stopped.

The point you won’t see on any media release or hear at a doorstop press conference is this: even if people haven’t drowned on the way to Australia, they’ve still drowned. Because people fleeing countries in the region are still getting on boats.

There are many inconvenient facts for those who won’t stop talking about stopping the boats. But perhaps the facts are not so bothersome if they aren’t on the nightly news. After all, if an asylum seeker drowns well enough away from Australian territorial waters, will there be a leadership challenge today? And have you seen Julie Bishop’s broach?

For the rest of us, here are some details.

According to the UNHCR report on Irregular Maritime Movements in South-East Asia, over 50,000 people set sail just from the Bay of Bengal area in January-November 2014. The smugglers operating in the region move people who are trafficked as well as those paying for passage outside of legal migration channels. The latter includes people such as ethnic Rohingya who do not have any nationality (and therefore no official travel documentation) and have a long history of persecution and discrimination by the Burmese government.

The UNHCR estimates that around 21,000 people have departed from the Bangladesh-Burmese maritime border in the two months of October and November 2014. About 10% were women, and around one-third of arrivals interviewed by UNHCR in Thailand and Malaysia were minors. The numbers for October 2014 are a marked increase (37%) from the year before.

And not all the deaths at sea are merely from drowning, according to the report:

“One in every three interviewees said at least one other passenger on their boat died en route; one in every 10 said 10 or more people died on board. Deaths were attributed to severe beatings by the crew, lack of food and water, illness, and heat.”

Globally, around 350,000 people have risked it all by taking a boat this year. On 10-11 December 2014, UNHCR is hosting a meeting looking specifically at protection at sea. The non-governmental organisations taking part have recommended, among other things, that to implement effective protection and ensure safety at sea, it is vital to “address ‘route causes’ and ‘root causes’ of forced and dangerous migration”.
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UNHCR notes that these reasons for irregular movement include: conflict and war, protracted refugee situations, statelessness, the absence or inadequacy of protection systems, family separation, poverty and economic inequality.

What is notably absent from all the recommendations to “stop the boats” from these experts is deterrence, which in Morrison’s parlance is also known as “taking the sugar off the table”. This was of course the honourable minister’s reasoning last month for reducing the number of refugees Australia would resettle from Indonesia and banning those who registered with UNHCR in Indonesia after 1 July 2014 from ever getting to Australia.

Sweet though that poison may be (and poisonous is certainly how one can characterise the way Australia treats those who come across the sea), no refugee is paying a people smuggler for any sort of benefit other than getting the hell out of the hell they were in.

At the opening of the UNHCR meeting yesterday, the High Commissioner for Refugees António Guterres said, “You can’t stop a person who is fleeing for their life by deterrence, without escalating the dangers even more”.

So what would work to actually stop people getting on boats? Again, according to the NGO recommendations, practical solutions for preventing irregular migration by sea include:

More opportunities for legal migration
Cooperative international agreements by states to provide more safe-havens for asylum seekers, e.g., through expanded UNHCR resettlement programmes; and
Migration and asylum policies that recognise the benefits of migration and the contributions of migrants and refugees to the development of countries of destination and origin.

It’s ultimately pretty simple and obvious: the key to reducing irregular movement of people by dangerous ways is to increase pathways for properly managed, safe and regulated movement. It involves as Guterres said, “looking at why people are fleeing, what prevents them from seeking asylum by safer means”.

In practice, nobody is going to be able to neatly pack their passport and customs declarations cards in order to flee discrimination or state persecution in a “regular” way. Which is why, in the case of those people, the Refugees Convention set up a system for countries around the world to join forces to help them, and why the UNHCR’s resettlement process allows for countries to accept refugees who cannot return to where they fled. Both of which the Australian government is slowly but surely repudiating.

Opening and expanding legal channels for migration and the movement of asylum seekers and refugees will reduce the use of smugglers and black-market operations. But for various reasons it’s doubtful Australia would be checking off anything on that list of solutions any time soon.

And so the boats will sail on, but just a little further off Morrison’s horizon.