THIS IS NOT FAKE

THIS IS NOT FAKE

This week is a massive show full of anarchist news from around the world. We also play some great songs some new and some classics.

This program is real. We are real, our news, information and discussion is all real. The beats we play are real as well.

(see below for more information about the content of the show)

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Spinifax Gum – Locled Up info
Tu P – Good thing Come info
NWA – Fuck Da Police info
MIA – Borders info
Chumbawamba – Give the Anarchist a Cigerette info

THE SHOW IN TEXT

Franklin Lopez sub.media has gone to Puerto Rico where he is from to help his family and the community clean up after Hurricane Maria

In Puerto Rico, a humanitarian catastrophe continues to unfold 12 days after Hurricane Maria struck the island. Over the weekend, the Pentagon said the percentage of Puerto Rico’s 3.5 million residents without access to clean drinking water rose to 55 percent. Only 5 percent of the island has electricity, while food and fuel remain scarce and about half of the island’s roads are impassable.

DONAL TRUMP: (Puerto Rico) is an island and it is surrounded by water, BIG water, ocean water.

Technically Puerto Rico is not surrounded by ocean water, but is touched by ocean water in the north (the Atlantic) and sea water (the Caribbean) in the south.

Franklin is encouraging people to donate to and assist grassroots humanitarian orgs Taller Salud is one http://www.tallersalud.com and Casa Taller Cangrejera http://agitarte.info/

Bad Cop No Donut

Ten months after a coronial inquiry recommended an end to the practice a woman in Western Australia has been jailed for 14 days in loo of paying $3900 in unpaid fines.

The fines date back to a dispute over an unregistered dog in 2012 and police arrested the woman after being called to the house regarding a domestic violence incident.

Meanwhile her children are being cared for by an aunt in their home where the power has been cut.

The case mirrors the case of Miss Dhu an Aboriginal woman who died after three days in custody. Police had been called to her house because her partner was suspected to be breaching a family violence order.

Instead they did a background check on Miss Dhu and found $3622 in unpaid fines.

In Spain, more than 800 people were injured Sunday after Spanish police stormed polling stations across the country’s Catalonia region and tried to forcibly prevent people from voting in a Catalan independence referendum, firing tear gas and physically attacking prospective voters.

The Spanish government says the referendum is illegal. Ahead of Sunday’s vote, Spanish police seized control of ballots and fliers, raided the Catalan regional government’s offices and even shut down pro-independence websites.

Late on Sunday night, the Catalan regional government said 90 percent of Catalan voters chose independence.

The leader of Catalonia insisted on Monday that Sunday’s independence referendum, though marred by clashes and rejected by the Spanish government, had earned his region the right to a separate state and that he would press ahead to make the vote binding. Spain rejects the referendum. Anarchists have been calling for a general strike.

Trouble 6 – Adapt and Destroy: Counterinsurgency and Social

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Despite the unimaginable capacity for violence and coercion that they wield, states are far more vulnerable than they let on. This is not only true of the so-called “failed states” currently plagued by civil war and internal strife, but also the imperialist centers of global capitalism themselves. Their fatal weakness is built into their design; modern states are incredibly complicated and dynamic political constructions, yet at their core they remain what they have always been – vehicles of social organization aimed at facilitating the exploitation of the many, for the enrichment of the few. Without the active or passive consent of the many, the few are in serious trouble.

WATCH TROUBLE

ANARCHY vs DEMOCRACY

ANARCHY vs DEMOCRACY

In this jam packed show we cover police violence, refugee news and we talk about and hear from the guy who head butted Tony Abbott.

The featured audio for this week is a talk by Barbara Hart regarding anarchism and democracy.

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We also announce this big news from Sub.media.

MUSIC

Laceration Mantra – Victims of Hate info
Corporate Avenger – Christians Murdered Indians info
Lavish – Homosapien info
Impossible Odds feat Georgia Corowa – Everything Odds info
Penny Dreaduls – Straight to the Golden Arches info
Chumbawamba – Give the Anarchist a Cigerette info

shirtfrontastrolabe

White Rock – a story of Afghan refugees in Iran

Much like our own governments and media fuel hatred and resentment about refugees so too does the Iranian government about refugees from Afghanistan who have crossed their border seeking safety from war.

This is a story of a massacre of 630 Afghan prisoners at the Safed Sang (White Rock) refugee camp after they began to protest the aberrant conditions they were being kept in.

There is no happy ending to this movie as 2 Iranian helicopters arrive and open fire.

 

Across the Void: Behrouz Boochani

Across the Void: Behrouz Boochani

behrouz_turnbull

When the Australian immigration department incarcerated Behrouz Boochani, a Kurdish journalist fleeing the oppressive Islamic regime in Iran, they made a huge tactical error.

Seasoned at fighting human rights abuses in his home country Boochani has continued inside the Manus Island detention centre in Papua New Guinea.

He’s not the only voice speaking out from inside this prison like facility but he is one of the loudest.

Voices like his will be part of what brings this unjust, unfair system to its knees.

His writing has featured in major newspapers in Australia, and around the world, and is opening up the gates of this prison and exposing the human rights abuses occurring inside.

After several failed attempts I finally managed to record an interview with Behrouz, coincidentally just when he announced he had shot and co directed a film from inside Manus – ‘‘Chauka, please tell us the time’.

This interview was recorded by using Skype from my computer to ring Behrouz’s mobile. Due to this occasionally there’s some odd bleeps and bloops.

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The Chauka bird of Manus Island.
The Chauka bird of Manus Island.

A review of Chauka, please tell us the time.

By Arnold Zable.

‘Chauka, please tell us the time’ is a remarkable film,’ shot on a mobile phone, in restricted and distressing circumstances by Kurdish-Iranian journalist and writer, Behrouz Boochani.

Incarcerated since mid-2013 in the Manus Island Detention Centre, Boochani co-directs the film with Amsterdam based Iranian filmmaker and editor, Arash Kamali Sarvestani.

Far removed from the action, Sarvestani, honours Boochani’s vision, and works with him, across a vast distance, to create a poetic, hypnotic film, which is both a work of great artistry, and a damning inditement of a brutal policy.

At the heart of the film, the central thread around which all the others are woven—is the chauka, a bird that is sacred and central to Manus Island culture.

The camera roams through the centre, and beyond, and conveys the torturous ordeal endured by the 900 men, incarcerated in the prime of their life, for over 40 months now, endlessly waiting, aimlessly pacing, enduring the heat, the erosion of hope, and destruction of the spirit.

The many visual and aural threads include tense phone-calls back home, hinting at family breakdown and the unbearable pain of separation: ‘I am parted from my child,’ one asylum seeker laments in his three-minute weekly call. Referring to a child born after he fled his country, a detainee says: ‘I haven’t had a chance to hold him, touch him or feel his presence’.

We hear the incessant whirring of fans, the dentist-like drill of the fumigation apparatus. We witness the wasted lives of men, their loss of agency: ‘I have no control over this’, says one. ‘Look mum, please don’t cry. Please don’t cry. Look mum, I am stuck here’, pleads another.

Boochani’s mobile phone pans over the cramped living spaces and the tiny cubicles, partitioned by sheets and tarpaulins to create a fragile and claustrophobic privacy.

We hear the comments of broken spirits: ’I prefer to be dead because I have nothing anymore… no one is waiting for me, and I am waiting for no one. I have lost everything.’

There are startling, poetic surreal-like images—rows of empty white plastic chairs leaning against the wire through which can be seen the unobtainable sea; the exuberant, beautiful faces of Manus Island children, dancing just beyond the wire, images of cats, contrastingly free, at home in any space within and without the wire.

The soundtrack compliments the imagery—with two recurring sounds in particular—a haunting Kurdish folksong, sung by one of the inmates, and the chirping of the chauka bird.

The folksong is a lament, a cry of longing, and the birdsong, a homage to Manus Island culture. The theme of the Chauka, and what it symbolises is a brilliant conception.

Through an ongoing conversation with several Manus Island men, we begin to understand the deep significance of the bird, and the ongoing colonial history of the island.

We come to see the cruel irony—the name of a bird that means so much in Manus Island culture, being used as the name for a high security prison within the wider prison, which, for a time, was a place of isolation, and punishment.

We come to understand that the appropriation of the Chauka, as a name for a place of such abuse and suffering, is obscene, and reflective of the neo-colonial system on which the offshore detention system is based.

Also interwoven is an eye witness account of the murder of Reza Barati in February 2014, and eerie footage of a detainee, who at the end of his tether, has self harmed, and is carried, at night, to an ambulance.

The mesmerising rhythm, the recurring imagery, the glimpses of Manus Island culture, the bird song, the sound of the sea, and the intermittent silences, have a powerful cumulative effect.

When we briefly see, at film’s end, Australian Prime Minister Turnbull trying to justify the brutal policy for which his government is responsible, he is condemned by his own words.

He tries in vain to justify the horror, and is revealed as a man in self-denial, representing a government that is, at best, in self denial.

Boochani’s inclusive vision is enhanced by the respect he shows for the Manus Islanders. The mobile phone camera lingers on scenes of island life and culture.

Boochani allows the voices of Manus islanders to be heard. The people of the island are stuck in a terrible dilemma, co opted into the offshore processing system through their desperate need for work.

They are on a lower rung in the camp hierarchy, with the Australian government firmly established at the apex.
Chauka please tell me the time’ is driven by a unique, poetic vision. It is filmed by a man who has an eye for life’s beauty, but also deeply feels its injustices, and cruelties—a man who has personally suffered these injustices.

Boochani is at heart an artist, who works intuitively, and instinctually. He, and his distant partner, Arash Kamali Sarvestani, allow the images, the sounds, the snatches of conversation, to speak for themselves.

They transcend the severe limitations of the circumstances under which the film was shot, to give us a glimpse of hell, juxtaposed against the island’s tropical beauty and fragments of its indigenous culture.

They have documented a specific time and place, and helped expose the horror that is indefinite offshore detention, whilst remaining true to the paradoxical beauty of their art-form, and their deeply humanistic vision of life.

NAURU LEAKS

nauru165

I was pretty excited about this show. Having one of the people who leaked the documents that made up the Nauru Files was a fantastic opportunity, but also sure to be emotional and distressing.
The interview with Paul starts about 25 mins in. 

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First up though continuing one from last weeks special (show to be uploaded soon) on the Spanish Revolution is a reading from a text by a member of the Iron Column an anarchist militia active in the civil war. More info here.

The text is ‘A day Mournful and Overcast’. The reading is from Resonance Audio.

The rest of the show is an interview with Paul J Stevenson who leaked 2000 incident reports he gathered while working on Nauru and Manus.

He is a psychologist and traumatologist who worked at both centres for over a year. What he witnessed was so bad he began documenting the horrors unfolding inside Australia’s offshore detention centres.

MUSIC

Rebel Diaz ft. Dead Prez and Rakaa Irisience – Which Side are you On? info
Stage Bottles – Sometimes anti social always anti fascist info
Across the Border – Alerta Alerta Antifascista info
Tu P ft. Stem Master – Border Force Facts info
Combat Wombat – Asylum info
Chumbawamba – The Day the Nazi Died info

 

 

From Manus Prison

Behrouz Boochani

From Manus prison:

Behrouz Bouchani

Yesterday the evidence of shocking abuse of teenage prisoners in the Northern Territory juvenile detention shook Australia. Straight away the Prime Minister announced a Royal Commission and the Northern Territory Corrections Minister was sacked. That is important and valuable that a big part of the society has a strong reaction about human rights abuses in juvenile detention.

But there is a big question and that is, why Australian politicians and people don’t care about those reports that international organisations like Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, UN committee against torture, and also the Australian Senate inquiry published about abuse, assaults, rapes and torture in Australian prisons in Manus and Nauru.

I give you an example. George Brandis says the Royal Commission about juvenile detention should ask many important things. Why was such brutal mistreatment of detainees allowed to happen? Is there a culture of abuse? Why was earlier evidence of serious problems not acted on enough? And did those people who did the abuse even understand they had a duty of care? These questions are so important and I have a question for this man and other Australian politicians.

Why do you never ask these questions about Manus and Nauru?


It shows that you don’t believe in human rights, and only use this concept for political aims. I mean that the human rights concept is only a cover for your political games and I wonder why Australian people don’t think deeply about the political actions of their politicians.

Human rights is a global value and we don’t have this right to discriminate between people. I know Aboriginal people in Australia are so discriminated against and that must change. They are human, and refugees in Manus and Nauru are human, and there is not any difference between people everywhere. I think that this discrimination shows us that moral values are completely collapsed in Australia and western countries.

We can not say that we believe in human rights and principles, and make discrimination between people. This kind of discrimination directly affects global values and it is dangerous for our civilization. Abuse of any person is wrong, and we need Australian governments to stop abusing people in juvenile detention, and in Manus and Nauru too.

Another point is that this is the best time for Australia to think deeply about the prison concept and find an answer for this question – why is prison a big part of Australian culture?

This a big moment when people and media should continue to ask this question because I know that the politicians are only trying to hide that this is happening under some moral words, and be sure that if Australia does not find an answer this kind of abuse and violence will happen again and again.

Behrouz Boochani is a Kurdish refugee who fled Iran, in danger of his life. He sought protection in Australia but has been incarcerated on Manus Island in immigration detention since 2013.

Inside Nauru: As told by Refugees not Channel 9

A Current Affair’s news crew were the first outside television crew allowed access to Nauru Australia’s refugee dumping ground.

They promise a story that will stun Australians. It is unclear in what way it will stun. Will they portray the prison island in it’s true light or will they provide an honest account.

In all likely hood many will be stunned by just how low ACA will go.

Aside from the fact the government would not have allowed them access to the island had they thought the show would do proper independent journalism, apparently the film crew were followed around by Nauruan government officials and police.

This documentary is made by refugees on Nauru. This is what the government and corporate interests don’t want you to see.